"Now in its 13th year, The Josephine Ulrick and Win Schubert Photography Award is considered one of the most important annual surveys of contemporary Australian photographic practice. This highly anticipated award, with a total $30,000 in prizes and acquisitions, is a highlight of Gold Coast City Gallery's exhibition program."

www.theartscentregc.com.au

"Established in 2006 to promote excellence in photography, the annual non-acquisitive William and Winifred Bowness Photography Prize is an initiative of the MGA Foundation.

The Bowness Photography Prize has quickly become Australia's most important photography prize. It is also one of the country's most open prizes for photography. In the past, finalists have included established and emerging photographers, art and commercial photographers."

www.mga.org.au

"Though most of the photographs that mark this group exhibition describe the landscape and the architecture than rests upon it, there is a distinctly psychological bent to The Study of Everything. Featuring work from Greg Spiller, Cameron Clarke and David-Ashley Kerr, among others, this show uses the land, its foliage and structures as a setting for decay and identity. Vivian Cooper Smith's trio of compact, abstract images might be read as a poetic allegory for memory and its loss. Re-photographing prints that he has creased, scrunched and painted with watercolour, his photographs lengthen and complicate the path from referent to image. Michael Miller's striking large-scale photographs of abandoned motel rooms and mining towns, meanwhile, tell a tale of abandonment and the links between economy and place. Linsey Gosper's trio of works are particularly intriguing, as she renders nature as a kind of psychosexual seductress. A snarl of thorns and voluptuous bed of vines border a youthful male body entrapped in a forest of doom."

DAN RULE - the Age, June 30th 2012

"Melbourne photographer Michael Miller's technically astute, though humanist, photographs from Norway's far north-eastern tip wrangle a clutch of seemingly counteracting forces, subjects and points of focus. Across 15 prints, The High North describes a geographical and social locale in all its distinctiveness and peculiarity. But what really sets these works apart is the respect and dignity with which it does so. Offsetting majestic flashes of rugged landscapes with incisive portraits, glimpses of industry and nondescript suburban streetscapes, Miller's photographs are striking and hushed in their timbre. It is perhaps the more abstract, almost sculptural gestures - a cascade of icicles paused in its descent down a rock face, a young debutant propped on a yellow milk crate in the snow - that speak the loudest. These thoughtful works describe the melange of climactic, infrastructural and human data that create a sense of place."


DAN RULE - the Age, March 10th 2012


THE COLUR FACTORY GALLERY - March 2st till 31st, 2012